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Kilauea: Up close and personal with red hot science! -- Science Nation


Hawaii's Kilauea volcano is one of the best places on Earth to study processes within basaltic volcanoes. Its high eruption frequency, easy access to lavas, and distinct geologic setting far from plate boundaries or continents allow researchers to address fundamental problems related to active volcanoes. Kilauea is also one of the longest currently erupting volcanoes--its current active period began in 1983! Another constant at Kilauea, besides the flowing lava, has been University of Hawaii geologist Mike Garcia. With support from the National Science Foundation (NSF), Garcia has been leading studies of Kilauea for a generation, adding to the extensive knowledge base on this volcano. Two of the primary goals are to determine what has triggered Kilauea's effusive, explosive cycles over the last 2200 years and when long eruptions, such as the current one, will stop.

Original air date: May 16, 2016

Credit: National Science Foundation (NSF)

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This is an episode from Science Nation, NSF's online magazine that's all about science for the people.

 
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