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Discovery

New research detects Alzheimer's disease markers in nonhuman primates

The brain of a chimpanzee

The brain of a chimpanzee. Chimpanzees are the closest living relatives to humans. Observing the similarities and differences between the human and chimpanzee brain will help scientists better understand the development of the human brain and may hold the key to understanding how and why humans are uniquely susceptible to many brain diseases.

Credit: Mary Ann Raghanti, Kent State University


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Tau black tangles and amyloid beta in the brain of a 57-year-old chimpanzee.

Tau black tangles and amyloid beta in the brain of a 57-year-old chimpanzee. The co-occurrence of these two proteins is a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease in humans. The tau-positive neuron in the center (black) is at the pretangle/tangle stage. The amyloid beta deposits are present in nearby blood vessels (red).

Credit: Mary Ann Raghanti, Kent State University


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Amyloid beta deposits in the blood vessels in the brain of a 58-year-old female chimpanzee.

Amyloid beta deposits in the blood vessels in the brain of a 58-year-old female chimpanzee.

Credit: Mary Ann Raghanti, Kent State University


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Amyloid beta plaques in the brain of a 58-year-old female chimpanzee.

Amyloid beta plaques in the brain of a 58-year-old female chimpanzee.

Credit: Mary Ann Raghanti, Kent State University


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