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News Release 06-158

NSF Commemorates the 50th Anniversary of First Flight To Land at the South Pole

Gus Shinn honored at Florida event

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A print of the aircraft <i>Que Sera Sera</i> at the South Pole is autographed by the pilot.

A print of the aircraft Que Sera Sera at the South Pole is autographed by pilot Conrad C. "Gus" Shinn.

Credit: National Science Foundation


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<i>Que Sera Sera</i> lands at the South Pole.

Que Sera Sera lands at the South Pole.

Credit: U.S. Navy


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<i>Que Sera Sera</i> was the first plane to land at the South Pole on Oct. 31, 1956.

Que Sera Sera was the first plane to land at the South Pole on Oct. 31, 1956.

Credit: National Science Foundation/United States Antarctic Program


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Plane over South Pole

A modern version of the aircraft that first landed at the South Pole flies over the Pole in 2006 on the way to McMurdo Station.

Credit: Ethan Dicks, National Science Foundation


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Photo of DC-3 landing

A DC-3, similar to the first plane to land at the Pole, touches down in Antarctica in 2006.

Credit: Ethan Dicks, National Science Foundation


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