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Impact

New monitoring technology helps farmers in drought-stricken areas better manage crops

NSF-funded researchers created a unique set of instrumentation that allows farmers and natural resource managers to collect data on rainfall, microclimate and other environmental factors

Arable Labs Inc.'s advanced microclimate and crop growth monitoring device, the Mark.


Arable Labs Inc.'s advanced microclimate and crop growth monitoring device, the Mark.
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September 29, 2017

In the Western United States, NSF-funded researchers deployed a unique set of instruments, called the Internet of Trees Micrometeorological System, to monitor how trees respond to repeated droughts at the cellular level and across ecosystems. The researchers refined the instrumentation during the study and, with funding from NSF’s Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and I-Corps programs, began rolling it out for commercial use.

The new technology, called Arable, will help farmers and natural resource managers collect data on rainfall, microclimate and other environmental characteristics. Pilots are underway with large growers, including California-based Driscoll’s and Australian-based Treasury Wine Estates.

NSF Directorate(s):
Directorate for Biological Sciences

Locations
New Jersey

Related Awards
#1549035 SBIR Phase I: Advanced bioeconomic forecasting enabled by next-generation crop monitoring
#1340270 Collaborative Research: Extreme Events and Ecological Acclimation: Scaling from Cells to Ecosystems

This NSF Impact is one of thousands of research outcomes made possible by NSF that help fuel the U.S. economy, enhance national security and sustain U.S. global leadership by advancing knowledge. You can search for more NSF Impacts at https://www.nsf.gov/impacts.

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