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Division of Mathematical Sciences


Name Email Phone Room
Bruce  Palka (703) 292-4856  1025 N  
Kevin  Clancey (703) 292-4870  1025 N  
Bruce  Kitchens (703) 292-2599  1025 N  
Edward  Taylor (703) 292-4872  1025 N  


Apply to PD 16-1281 as follows:

For full proposals submitted via FastLane: standard Grant Proposal Guide proposal preparation guidelines apply.
For full proposals submitted via the NSF Application Guide; A Guide for the Preparation and Submission of NSF Applications via Guidelines applies. (Note: The NSF Application Guide is available on the website and on the NSF website at:

Important Information for Proposers

A revised version of the NSF Proposal & Award Policies & Procedures Guide (PAPPG) (NSF 16-1), is effective for proposals submitted, or due, on or after January 25, 2016. Please be advised that, depending on the specified due date, the guidelines contained in NSF 16-1 may apply to proposals submitted in response to this funding opportunity.


Full Proposal Target Date

    October 3, 2017

    First Tuesday in October, Annually Thereafter

Research proposals (as opposed to conference proposals) are expected to be submitted by the target date. An extension may be granted under unusual extenuating circumstances, provided that approval is obtained from the cognizant Program Director prior to the target date.


The Analysis Program supports basic research in that area of mathematics whose roots can be traced to the calculus of Newton and Leibniz.  Given its centuries-old ties to physics, analysis has influenced developments from Newton’s mechanics to quantum mechanics and from Fourier’s study of heat conduction to Maxwell’s equations of electromagnetism to Witten’s theory of supersymmetry.  More generally, research supported by Analysis provides the theoretical underpinning for the majority of applications of the mathematical sciences to other scientific disciplines.  Current areas of significant activity include: nonlinear partial differential equations; dynamical systems and ergodic theory; real, complex and harmonic analysis; operator theory and algebras of operators on Hilbert space; mathematical physics; and representation theory of Lie groups/algebras.  Emerging areas include random matrix theory and its ties to classical analysis, number theory, quantum mechanics, and coding theory; and development of noncommutative geometry with its applications to modeling physical phenomena.  It should be stressed, however, that the underlying role of the Analysis Program is to provide support for research in mathematics at the most fundamental level.  Although this is often done with the expectation that the research will generate a payoff in applications at some point down the road, the principal mission of the Program is to tend and replenish an important reservoir of mathematical knowledge, maintaining it as a dependable resource to be drawn upon by engineers, life and physical scientists, and other mathematical scientists, as need arises.


Principal Investigators should carefully read the program solicitation "Conferences and Workshops in the Mathematical Sciences" (link below) to obtain important information regarding the substance of "conference proposals" (i.e., proposals for conferences, workshops, summer/winter schools, and similar activities).  For Analysis conference proposals with budgets not exceeding $50,000, which in accordance with NSF policy can be reviewed internally at NSF, the following target dates are in effect: for an event that will take place at some time prior to October 1 during a given year, the proposal should be submitted at the Analysis Program's normal target date in the previous year; for an event that will occur in the period October 1 through December 31 of a given year, the proposal should be submitted between May 1 and June 1 of that year.  An Analysis conference proposal with a budget request exceeding $50,000 should be submitted roughly seven months before the event is scheduled to take place, in order to allow time for external review.

Conferences and Workshops in the Mathematical Sciences


What Has Been Funded (Recent Awards Made Through This Program, with Abstracts)

Map of Recent Awards Made Through This Program