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Dan Stanzione: Frontera - Leadership-Class Computing and Cyberinfrastructure for Today and Tomorrow

CISE Distinguished Lecture - March 5, 2020 - 11am - Room E3410

March 5, 2020 11:00 AM  to 
March 5, 2020 12:00 PM
NSF Room E3410

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ABSTRACT: The NSF-Sponsored Frontera system, deployed in 2019 at the Texas Advanced Computing Center at the University of Texas at Austin, is currently the fifth largest supercomputer in the world, the largest general purpose machine, and the largest university-based system in the world. Frontera is the flagship NSF resource for computation at the very largest scale. Frontera is also the first phase in a plan for a larger, leadership-class computing facility (LCCF), proposed to be supported through the NSF MREFC (Major Research Equipment and Facilities Construction) fund.  This talk will cover the ground-breaking computational science and engineering happening today on the Frontera system. It will also cover the current achievements, challenges and directions in continuing to scale up computation, AI, and data analysis across many scientific disciplines, as well as the forming plans for the LCCF and how it will support the future needs for computational science and engineering.

BIO: Dr. Dan Stanzione, Associate Vice President for Research at The University of Texas at Austin since 2018 and Executive Director of the Texas Advanced Computing Center (TACC) since 2014, is a nationally recognized leader in high performance computing. He is the principal investigator (PI) for a National science Foundation (NSF) grant to deploy Frontera, which is the fastest supercomputer at any U.S. university. Stanzione is also the PI of TACC's Stampede2 and Wrangler systems, supercomputers for high performance computing and for data-focused applications, respectively. For six years he was co-PI of CyVerse, a large-scale NSF life sciences cyberinfrastructure. Stanzione was also a co-PI for TACC's Ranger and Lonestar supercomputers, large-scale NSF systems previously deployed at UT Austin. Stanzione received his bachelor's degree in electrical engineering and his master's degree and doctorate in computer engineering from Clemson University.

To attend the webinar, please register at:  http://www.tvworldwide.com/events/nsf/200305/

This event is part of Distinguished Lecture Series.

Meeting Type
Lecture

Contacts
Henry A Kautz, 703-292-2606, email: hkautz@nsf.gov

NSF Related Organizations
Directorate for Computer and Information Science and Engineering