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Discovery

American kestrels, most common predatory birds in U.S., can reduce need for pesticide use

A perching American kestrel.

Scientists have discovered that predators like American kestrels can take the place of pesticides.

Credit: Catherine Lindell


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Two researchers walking through a field and looking up at nest box in the trees.

Installing nest boxes in agricultural fields may increase numbers of American kestrels.

Credit: Catherine Lindell


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A young American kestrel perched on a person's hand.

A young American kestrel that was born in a nest box perches in a field of blueberry bushes.

Credit: Catherine Lindell


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Two researchers preparing a nest box.

Nest box preparation begins in winter, here in February, in time for adult kestrels to lay eggs.

Credit: Catherine Lindell


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A researcher carrying a nest box and its pole through an agricultural field.

Next step: transporting the nest box and its pole to an agricultural field.

Credit: Catherine Lindell


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Three researchers install a nest box in a field.

Researchers install a nest box in a field of blueberry bushes in Michigan.

Credit: Catherine Lindell


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