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Bacteria--Energy Producers of the Future? -- Science Nation


Bacteria--Energy Producers of the Future?

All of us use water and in the process, a lot of it goes to waste. Whether it goes down drains, sewers or toilets, much of it ends up at a wastewater treatment plant where it undergoes rigorous cleaning before it flows back to the environment. The process takes time, money and a lot of energy. What if that wastewater could be turned into energy? It almost sounds too good to be true, but environmental engineer Bruce Logan is working on ways to make it happen. Most treatment plants already use bacteria to break down the organic waste in the water. With support from NSF, Logan and his team at Penn State University are developing microbial fuel cells to channel the bacteria's hard work into energy.

Credit: National Science Foundation

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This is an episode from Science Nation, NSF's online magazine that's all about science for the people.

 
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