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Astronomy & Space Discoveries

NSF's public investment in science, engineering, education and technology helps to create knowledge and sustain prosperity. Read here about the Internet, microbursts, Web browsers, extrasolar planets, and more... a panoply of discoveries and innovations that began with NSF support.

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Page: Previous |Next (Showing: 31-44 of 44)

Composite image of supernova remnant W49B showing a barrel-shaped nebula. Search Is on for Hot Young Stars
Long duration gamma-ray bursts allow astronomers to collect more information than ever imagined
Released  September 21, 2007
Photo of TW Hydrae Planetary Construction Zone?
Astronomers detect the beginnings of planet formation in a dusty disk surrounding a nearby star
Released  July 5, 2007
2006 in Review 2006: Year in Review
A look back at some of the NSF-supported activities highlighted last year
Released  January 9, 2007
The Spiral Galaxy M51, with supernova. Teachers Strike Scientific Gold at Kitt Peak
Workshop participants take lucky images of a brand-new supernova
Released  August 26, 2005
Young man stands in front of a row of white telescopes. New Mexico Graduate Student Receives Costa Rica's Top Science Honor
At 26, Esteban Araya is the youngest person to ever receive the top science award from his native Costa Rica. A graduate student in astronomy at New Mexico Tech, Araya was honored for his research into the formation of massive stars.
Released  August 5, 2005
Star Kills Companion! Star Killed by Companion
Bizarre remains bear silent witness
Released  March 2, 2005
Six SDI views of Saturn's moon Titan A New Camera for Extrasolar Planets
It hasn't found planets yet—but in its first year of operation, the instrument has already proved its worth
Released  January 31, 2005
Sampling the Atacama Of Microbes and Mars
Desert microbe discovery has extraterrestrial implications
Released  December 17, 2004
Sound waves in the Sun Voyage to the Center of the Sun
The Sun "rings" like a bell---which lets GONG probe its deepest secrets.
Released  December 17, 2004
NSF South Pole research station Cold Flashes: Astrophysics at the South Pole
What one scientist calls the world’s weirdest telescope was built to detect high-energy particles, not the light from distant stars. In 1997, AMANDA recorded the first precise map of neutrinos from outer space as they zipped through Antarctic ice.
Released  October 13, 2004
Photo of a computer disk drive. From Moonbounce to Hard Drives: Correcting More Errors Than Previously Thought Possible
What does a Nobel laureate need to bounce a radio signal off the moon? A good error-correcting code, for one thing. Now, a breakthrough error-correction method has turned almost 40 years of conventional wisdom in digital communications on its head.
Released  August 11, 2004
Artist's conception of OGLE-TR-56b. Ogling Distant Stars
An NSF-funded project that monitors the brightness of stars has given astronomers a potent tool for discovering planets far beyond our part of the galaxy. We can expect to find more "exoplanets" in the decade ahead.
Released  August 9, 2004
comparison of our solar system with 55 Cancri system Distant Planetary System Has "Hometown" Look
After 15 years of observation and a lot of patience, the world's premier planet-hunting team found the first planetary system that reminded them of our home solar system.
Released  July 30, 2004
gamma-ray burst GRB021004 Wireless Network Helps Astronomers Observe Elusive Gamma-Ray Bursts
A gamma-ray burst (GRB) is one of the universe's most mysterious and explosive events. The High Performance Wireless Research and Education Network has given Palomar Observatory the speed astronomers need to pinpoint GRBs and catch them in the act.
Released  April 8, 2004

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