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National Science Foundation National Center for Science and Engineering Statistics
Characteristics of Doctoral Scientists and Engineers in the United States: 2006

 


General Notes

 

This report presents data from the 2006 Survey of Doctorate Recipients (SDR). The SDR is a panel survey that collects longitudinal data, biennially, on demographic and general employment characteristics of individuals who have received a doctorate in a science, engineering, or health field from a U.S. academic institution. Sampled individuals are followed from shortly after they receive their doctorate through age 75 years. The SDR sample is augmented each cycle with new samples of the most recent cohorts of science and engineering doctorate recipients, identified by the Survey of Earned Doctorates, an annual census of research doctorates awarded in the United States.

The detailed statistical tables presented here provide information on the number and median salaries of doctoral scientists and engineers by field of doctorate and occupation; demographic characteristics, such as sex, race/ethnicity, citizenship, and age; and employment-related characteristics, such as sector of employment, employer location, and labor-force rates.[1] Appendix A provides technical information about the survey methodology, coverage, concepts, definitions, sampling errors, and standard error tables; appendix B provides crosswalks defining field of doctorate and occupation classifications used in survey sampling. The 2006 SDR mail questionnaire is provided in appendix C.

The National Science Foundation and the National Institutes of Health sponsored the 2006 survey, which was conducted by the National Opinion Research Center (NORC) at the University of Chicago. It is the 17th in a series of surveys initiated in 1973 in response to the needs of the federal government for demographic and employment information on scientists and engineers trained at the doctoral level. The goal of the 2006 SDR is to provide policymakers and researchers with high-quality data on the career patterns and achievements of the nation's doctoral scientists and engineers.

Other data on doctoral scientists and engineers are available at http://www.nsf.gov/statistics/doctoratework/. For more information on survey data and methodology, please contact the project officer.



Footnotes

[1] Doctoral scientists and engineers are defined in this report as individuals less than 76 years of age who have received a doctorate in a science, engineering, or health field from a U.S. academic institution and who resided in the United States or one of its territories on 1 April 2006.


 
Characteristics of Doctoral Scientists and Engineers in the United States: 2006
Detailed Statistical Tables | NSF 09-317 | August 2009

Notes:

Errors in the coding of race/ethnicity data collected by the 2006 Survey of Doctorate Recipients have been corrected. Detailed information on this issue is available on our data-correction status page. The following data tables and their corresponding standard error tables have been replaced in this report with corrected versions: 3, 6, 8, 14, 19, 22, 24-28, 31, 34, 37, 38, 44, 47, 50, 56, 61, 64, 65, 72, 79.