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Fact Sheet

Engineers Week 2006: NSF Research Highlights

Today's engineers are inspiration for the future

Penelope SIS prepares for her surgical debut.


Penelope SIS prepares for her surgical debut.
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February 23, 2006

Engineers Week 2006 has arrived, and with it a chance to look back on the breakthroughs and developments engineers delivered in 2005.

NSF has a long history of supporting engineering, devoting more than $550 million dollars last year alone. The results of those investments have been rewarding, as the following 2005 highlights reveal.

Mitigating Damage from Disasters

Enhancing Human Capability

Improving Medical Technologies

Promoting Sustainability

New technologies and techniques

-NSF-

Media Contacts
Joshua A. Chamot, NSF, (703) 292-7730, jchamot@nsf.gov

The National Science Foundation (NSF) is an independent federal agency that supports fundamental research and education across all fields of science and engineering. In fiscal year (FY) 2016, its budget is $7.5 billion. NSF funds reach all 50 states through grants to nearly 2,000 colleges, universities and other institutions. Each year, NSF receives more than 48,000 competitive proposals for funding and makes about 12,000 new funding awards. NSF also awards about $626 million in professional and service contracts yearly.

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Science and Engineering Statistics: http://www.nsf.gov/statistics/
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The Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Solar-Powered Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (SAUV)
The Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Solar-Powered Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (SAUV).
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Engineers inspect a portion of a New Orleans floodwall damaged in Hurricane Katrina
Engineers inspect a portion of a New Orleans floodwall damaged in Hurricane Katrina.
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Hong Liu (left) and Bruce Logan examine an electrochemically assisted microbial reactor system
Hong Liu (left) and Bruce Logan examine an electrochemically assisted microbial reactor system.
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Ocean-buoy generators promise to convert the movement of waves into energy.
Ocean-buoy generators promise to convert the movement of waves into energy.
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Polymer fibers grow on a fingerprint at 30 degrees Celsius and a relatively high humidity
Polymer fibers grow on a fingerprint at 30 degrees Celsius and a relatively high humidity.
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