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Press Release 14-024
Volcanoes, including Mount Hood in the US, can quickly become active

Magma stored for thousands of years can erupt in as little as two months

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view of a mountain peak with patches of snow

Researchers have discovered that volcanoes can go from dormant to active very quickly.

Credit: OSU


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Geoscientist Adam Kent

Geoscientist Adam Kent considers results of studies of magma beneath Oregon's Mount Hood.

Credit: OSU


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Aerial view of gray volcanic deposits ridges along Mount Hood.

Gray volcanic deposits form ridges along the southeast and southwest flanks of Mount Hood.

Credit: NASA


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view of  Mount Hood reflecting in a lake

All appears quiet today on Mount Hood.

Credit: U.S. DOT


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Rsearchers in the filed looking at rocks

New studies indicate that magma beneath Mount Hood, other volcanoes, could liquefy in a short time.

Credit: OSU


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Mount Hood mirrored in a placid lake below

Mount Hood mirrored in a placid lake below. Will it always be this tranquil?

Credit: OSU


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