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All Images


Press Release 13-002
Magma in Earth's Mantle Forms Deeper Than Once Thought

Study simulating pressures in mantle beneath the ocean floor shows that rocks can melt at depths up to 250 kilometers

Back to article | Note about images

Lava coming from a volcano eruption

When magma reaches Earth's surface and erupts from a volcano, it becomes lava.

Credit: Wikimedia Commons


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Illustration showing magma generation seen from a cross-section of Earth's interior

Magma generation seen from a cross-section of Earth's interior beneath oceanic ridges.

Credit: Dasgupta Group/Rice University


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Detailed photo of peridotite, a pale green olive-colored rock

Peridotite is a pale green olive-colored rock derived from Earth's mantle.

Credit: Wikimedia Commons


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Microscopic sample of rock in a high-pressure lab showing evidence of magma formation.

Microscopic sample of rock in a high-pressure lab; it shows evidence of magma formation.

Credit: Dasgupta Group/Rice University


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Geologist Rajdeep Dasgupta using hydraulic presses to crush rocks at high pressures.

Geologist Rajdeep Dasgupta uses hydraulic presses to crush rocks at high pressures.

Credit: Jeff Fitlow/Rice University


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Scientists Rajdeep Dasgupta, Ananya Mallik and Kyusei Tsuno at work in the lab.

Scientists Rajdeep Dasgupta, Ananya Mallik and Kyusei Tsuno at work in the lab.

Credit: Jeff Fitlow/Rice University


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