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Press Release 12-221

Where Have Our Winters Gone?

Changes in winter hydrology, ecology and biogeochemistry are focus of sessions at American Geophysical Union (AGU) conference

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Photo of snowy furtree branches reflecting in water

Winter as we know it: is it going, going...gone?

Credit: Wikimedia Commons


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Dwarf bluebells in bloom with a snowy mountain peak in the background.

Dwarf bluebells: one of the earliest spring-bloomers. Queen bees come to it for nectar.

Credit: David Inouye


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Stripes of dust visible on the snow in Colorado's Rocky Mountains.

"Zebra stripes" of dust are visible on the snow in Colorado's Rocky Mountains.

Credit: Center for Snow and Avalanche Studies


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A Mormon Fritillary butterfly feeds on an aspen fleabane daisy, a main nectar source.

A Mormon Fritillary butterfly feeds on an aspen fleabane daisy, a main nectar source.

Credit: Carol Boggs


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Twelve dust layers on snow in a study plot in Colorado's Senator Beck Basin Study Area.

Twelve dust layers in a study plot in Colorado's Senator Beck Basin Study Area.

Credit: Center for Snow and Avalanche Studies


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Male broad-tailed hummingbird with the yellow pollen on its bill.

Male broad-tailed hummingbird with yellow pollen on its bill, likely from a glacier lily.

Credit: David Inouye


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