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Press Release 12-198

In Blown-Down Forests, a Story of Survival

To preserve forest health, the best management decision may be to do nothing

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Photo of NSF's Harvard Forest site with trees down.

In 1990, this part of NSF's Harvard Forest LTER site was a jumble of downed trees.

Credit: Marcheterre Fluet


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A photo of Sassafras leaves growing between branches.

Sassafras comes to life after significant storm damage.

Credit: Bill Byrne


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Photo of threeHarvard Forest ecologists examining wood in the hurricane re-creation experiment.

Harvard Forest ecologists monitor downed wood in the hurricane re-creation experiment.

Credit: John Hirsch


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Photo of trees in the Harvast Forest nine years after the expriement started.

Nine years into the Harvard Forest hurricane re-creation experiment, trees were everywhere.

Credit: David Foster


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A photo of broken and snapped-off trees at a tornado impact area in Southbridge, Mass., in 2011.

Broken and snapped-off trees at a tornado impact area in Southbridge, Mass., in 2011.

Credit: Bill Byrne


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