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Press Release 12-168
Precision Motion Tracking - Thousands of Cells at a Time

Novel microscopy technique could open new windows into protozoan behavior, microbial diseases and fertility

Back to article | Note about images

Illustration and data set depicting the new microscopy technique.

This illustration and data set depict the new microscopy technique developed by Ozcan and his colleagues at UCLA. The top image shows a schematic of the system, which involves two partially coherent light sources (a red 625 nanometer wavelength LED and a blue 470 nanometer wavelength LED) that simultaneously illuminate the microscope field of view from two different angles. A CMOS sensor records the resulting holograms and software uses that information to encode the exact positions of the target cells. The bottom image shows the reconstructed 3D trajectories of 1,575 human male gamete cells in a volume of 7.9 microliters.

Credit: Ozcan Research Group at UCLA


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Images showing human male gamete cell swimming patterns.

These images show, for the first time, that human male gamete cells swim primarily in four types of patterns. The insets show the front-view of the trajectories.

Credit: Ozcan Research Group at UCLA


Download the high-resolution JPG version of the image. (1.9 MB)

Use your mouse to right-click (Mac users may need to Ctrl-click) the link above and choose the option that will save the file or target to your computer.



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