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Press Release 12-044
NSF Honors Two Early Career Researchers With Alan T. Waterman Award

Harvard's Robert Wood and MIT's Scott Aaronson win NSF's most prestigious award, which will help fuel their research pursuits

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Photos of Scott Aaronson, left, and Robert Wood, right, 2012 NSF Alan T. Waterman Awardees.

Scott Aaronson of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (left) and Robert Wood of the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (right) will each receive the National Science Foundation's 2012 Alan T. Waterman Award.

Credit: Scott Aaronson, MIT, and Eliza Grinnell, Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences.


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Scott Aaronson of MIT has been awarded the 2012 Alan T. Waterman Award.

Credit: National Science Foundation

 

Robert Wood of Harvard University, an Expeditions in Computing Awardee, has been awarded the 2012 Alan T. Waterman Award.

Credit: National Science Foundation

 

Scott Aaronson of MIT presented his research to the National Science Board on Thursday, May 3, 2012.

Credit: National Science Foundation

 

Robert Wood of Harvard University presented his research to the National Science Board on Thursday, May 3, 2012.

Credit: National Science Foundation

 

Image of the Monolithic Bee that pops up and performs more than 20 origami folds.

Devised by Wood and other engineers at Harvard, the Monolithic Bee (or "Mobee") pops up within an assembly scaffold, which performs more than 20 origami assembly folds. This innovative fabrication technique, which cheaply and efficiently produces devices on the scale of just a few millimeters, was inspired by children's pop-up books.

Credit: Pratheev Sreetharan, Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences


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Image of Scott Aaronson wearing a sarong while proving a theorem in his class.

Who says a serious professor can't prove a theorem while wearing a sarong? Scott Aaronson provides some levity while teaching fundamentals at MIT.

Credit: Scott Aaronson, MIT


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