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Press Release 11-127
Scientists Measure Body Temperature of Dinosaurs for the First Time

Some dinosaurs were as warm as modern mammals

Back to article | Note about images

Image of a skull reconstruction of Camarasaurus.

Skull reconstruction of Camarasaurus; its body temperature was similar to that of humans.

Credit: Sauriermuseum Aathal, Switzerland


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NSF-funded scientists John Eiler and Rob Eagle of Caltech measure body temperatures of dinosaurs for the first time.

Credit: Caltech

 

Photo of scientists unearthing dinosaur fossils at Como Bluff Quarry, Wyoming.

Scientists at work unearthing dinosaur fossils at a site in Como Bluff Quarry, Wyoming.

Credit: Melissa Connely, Wyoming Dinosaur International Society


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Photo of a scientist inspecting a find in Como Bluff Quarry sediments.

Member of research team closely inspects find in Como Bluff Quarry sediments.

Credit: Melissa Connely, Wyoming Dinosaur International Society


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Close-up of a Camarasaurus skull, displaying its dentition with large spatulate teeth.

Close-up of a Camarasaurus skull, displaying its dentition with large spatulate teeth.

Credit: Sauriermuseum Aathal, Switzerland


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Sideview of a Camarasaurus skeleton in sandstone from the Howe Ranch, Wyoming.

Sideview of a Camarasaurus skeleton still in sandstone, found on Howe Ranch, Wyoming.

Credit: Sauriermuseum Aathal, Switzerland


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Photo of a Camarasaurus skull with many spatulate teeth.

Camarasaurus skull with many spatulate teeth, typical for this plant-eating sauropod dinosaur.

Credit: Sauriermuseum Aathal, Switzerland


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Cover of the June 24, 2011 issue of the journal Science.

The researchers' work is described in the June 23, 2011 issue of the online journal Science Express.

Credit: Copyright AAAS 2011


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