text-only page produced automatically by LIFT Text Transcoder Skip all navigation and go to page contentSkip top navigation and go to directorate navigationSkip top navigation and go to page navigation
National Science Foundation
News
design element
News
News From the Field
For the News Media
Special Reports
Research Overviews
NSF-Wide Investments
Speeches & Lectures
NSF Current Newsletter
Multimedia Gallery
News Archive
News by Research Area
Arctic & Antarctic
Astronomy & Space
Biology
Chemistry & Materials
Computing
Earth & Environment
Education
Engineering
Mathematics
Nanoscience
People & Society
Physics
 

Email this pagePrint this page
All Images


Press Release 10-235
What "Pine" Cones Reveal About the Evolution of Flowers

Research genetically traces flowers to a single common ancestor

Back to article | Note about images

Photo of the cycad Zamia furfuracea showing bright red seeds erupting from the cones.

Close-up of a cycad with seed cones. Bright red seeds are erupting from the cones. Plant is tentatively identified as Zamia furfuracea. Cycads make seed-producing pine cone-like structures instead of flowers. Analysis shows Zamia's male cones have genetic wiring similar to flowers.

Credit: Randolph Femmer/life.nbii.gov


Download the high-resolution JPG version of the image. (2.5 MB)

Use your mouse to right-click (Mac users may need to Ctrl-click) the link above and choose the option that will save the file or target to your computer.

Photo of water lilies in flower.

Based on recent RNA testing, biologists conclude a flower with genetic programming similar to a water lily may have been the very first flower.

Credit: 2010 Jupiterimages Corporation

 

Photo of an avocado flower.

Persea americana (Avocado) flowers are said to essentially be "genetic fossils" still carrying genetic instructions that would have allowed the transformation of cones from non-flowering seed plants into flowers.

Credit: Andre Chanderbali, University of Florida


Download the high-resolution JPG version of the image. (81 KB)

Use your mouse to right-click (Mac users may need to Ctrl-click) the link above and choose the option that will save the file or target to your computer.

Graphic showing the ABCE model of floral organ identity.

Researchers recently found a very significant degree of genetic overlap among intergrading floral organs in water lilies and avocado but less overlap in poppy and Arabidopsis, indicating the boundaries between floral organs are not all that sharp in the early angiosperm groups. This is the ABCE model of floral organ identity. Sepals are produced where A function acts alone, petals where A and B functions overlap, stamens where B and C functions combine, and carpels where C function acts alone.

Credit: Andre Chanderbali, University of Florida


Download the high-resolution JPG version of the image. (26 KB)

Use your mouse to right-click (Mac users may need to Ctrl-click) the link above and choose the option that will save the file or target to your computer.



Email this pagePrint this page
Back to Top of page