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Press Release 10-170
New Species of Multi-horned Dinosaurs Unearthed in Utah

With looks that kill, two newly discovered dinosaur species once roamed lost continent in what is now southern Utah

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Photo of Scott Sampson with the fossil of the species Kosmoceratops richardsoni.

Scott Sampson pictured with the fossil of the species Kosmoceratops richardsoni. Scott Sampson is a research curator at the Utah Museum of Natural History, adjunct associate professor in the Department of Geology and Geophysics at the University of Utah, and first author on the paper describing the discovery to appear in the jounal PLoS. This evidence of a new species of horned dinosaur has been found in Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument in Southern Utah.

Credit: Scott Sampson, University of Utah


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View a video of Dr. Scott Sampson discussing the two new species of dinosaur.

View a video of Dr. Scott Sampson discussing the two new species of dinosaur discovered at Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument.

Credit: Utah Museum of Natural History

 

An artist conception of newly discovered dinosaur species unearthed from the lost continent

An artist conception of the newly discovered dinosaur species--Utahceratops gettyi (U-tah-SARA-tops get-EE-i) and Kosmoceratops richardsoni (KOZ-mo-SARA-tops RICH-ard-SON-i)--found in Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument in southern Utah, the "lost island continent" of Laramidia.

Credit: Lukas Panzarin


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Photo of skulls of the two new species of dinosaurs.

Skulls of the two new species of dinosaurs.

Credit: Utah Museum of Natural History


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Dinosaur distribution on the continent.

Dinosaur distribution on the continent.

Credit: Utah Museum of Natural History


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Photo of Scott Sampson with the skull of Utahceratops gettyi.

Scott Sampson with the skull of Utahceratops gettyi, measuring about seven feet long.

Credit: Utah Museum of Natural History


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Photo of researchers digging for fossils in Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument, Utah.

Researchers dig for fossils in Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument, southern Utah, a site that has now emerged as one of the most important paleontological reserves in the world.

Credit: Utah Museum of Natural History


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