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Press Release 09-068
Decline in Greenhouse Gas Emissions Would Reduce Sea-Level Rise, Save Arctic Sea Ice

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Photo of flooding in Florida's Key West.

Population centers at low elevations like Florida's Key West are vulnerable to sea-level rise.

Credit: NOAA


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Simulations show air temperatures if (top) emissions continue, or (bottom) if cut by 70 percent.

New computer simulations show the extent that average air temperatures at Earth's surface could warm by 2080-2099 compared to 1980-1999, if (top) greenhouse gases emissions continue to climb at current rates, or if (bottom) society cuts emissions by 70 percent. In the latter case, temperatures rise by less than 2 C (3.6 F) across nearly all of Earth's populated areas. However, unchecked emissions could lead to warming of 3 C (5.4 F) or more across parts of Europe, Asia, North America and Australia.

Credit: NCAR


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Illustration showing the many components of CSSM from clouds to ocean currents to soil moisture.

This graphic illustrates the many components included in the CCSM, ranging from cirrus and stratus clouds to ocean currents and soil moisture.

Credit: Paul Grabhorn, UCAR


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