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Press Release 04-066
President Bush Honors Excellence in Science, Mathematics and Engineering Mentoring

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2003 PAESMEM recipients

2003 PAESMEM recipients.

Credit: Jack Hartzman


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Chellu Chetty

Chellu Chetty, Savannah State University, a professor of biology, has a strong record of working with students at the undergraduate and graduate levels, particularly with African-American students and with underrepresented communities. He has developed strategies that involve and challenge students in their academic and career pursuits. Chetty's presidential award will help support the establishment of a mentoring and advising office for the College of Sciences and Technology at Savannah State.

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Denice D. Denton

Denice D. Denton, University of Washington, dean of engineering, has a national reputation in traditional and peer mentoring of students, and in the development of long-term mentoring programs from K-12 to undergraduates and graduates. Her mentoring programs have provided the basis for cultural and policy changes in science and engineering. She has created science and engineering projects for K-12 students and worked directly with them. She has helped women and minority junior faculty, senior faculty and administrators advance in their careers and to become mentors.

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Christine Grant

Christine Grant, North Carolina State University, is one of only six tenured African-American women faculty members in chemical engineering nationwide. Her outreach activities serve students from K-12 through graduate education. She includes students in her research agenda, and she gives additional attention to mentoring junior faculty. She has built an array of activities that seek to stop leaks in the academic pipeline for women and students from traditionally under-represented groups and teaches students how to work within the system.

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Linda Hayden

Linda Hayden, Elizabeth City State University, is a tenured professor of computer science with 30 years of college experience in teaching and nurturing student researchers. Her science programs include Nurturing ECSU Research Talent (NERT), several efforts funded by NASA, and the Celebration of Women in Mathematics program. She works with undergraduate students, middle- and high-school-aged girls and K-12 teachers, and extends her reach to a number of historically black colleges and universities around the country, revealing a deep commitment to increasing the number of minorities in scientific and technical careers.

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Rudolf Henning

Rudolf Henning, University of South Florida, is a professor of electrical engineering who developed a 25-week "YES-We Care" program to interest, influence and prepare minority pre-college students for success as engineering students. For more than 20 years, Henning's activities to expand the diversity pool have been reward based, supporting parental participation with students. His focus is on increasing self-esteem and motivation by fostering tolerance and mutual respect, encouraging the communication writing skills of students.

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Ellis Ingram

Ellis Ingram, University of Missouri-Columbia, has established a continuum of mentoring activities for participants from early childhood to postdoctoral and faculty levels. A medical doctor, Ingram, has reached students through an after-school program for children aged 4-14, a science club for middle-school to early high-school students, and an Excellence in Learning Program for senior high-school students that provides education in anatomy and medicine through Washington University. His mentoring activities are distributed across diverse groups, including undergraduate minority students in science and medicine.

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Calvin Mackie

Calvin Mackie, Tulane University, is a tenured associate professor of mechanical engineering, whose mentoring and outreach activities extend to pre-college, undergraduate, and graduate populations. Active in the community, speaking to large audiences and to schools, he is authentic, humorous and has a high-energy, charismatic style in communicating science. He also develops video and other visual materials. His skill in using a unique cultural framework in his mentoring has effectively motivated students from diverse backgrounds to succeed.

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Lisa Pruitt

Lisa Pruitt, University of California-Berkeley, is a professor of biomedical engineering who has established a mentoring program and approach that emphasizes lifelong learning. She has helped to smooth the way for students making the transition from undergraduate to graduate levels and has also established high-school outreach programs. Her efforts in establishing learning communities will foster cohorts of students who can give each other support. She has provided research opportunities for students and co-authored publications with them, while developing their mentoring skills to serve as "peer" mentors.

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Margaret Werner-Washburne

Margaret Werner-Washburne, University of New Mexico, is a faculty member of the biology department, who, for 15 years has mentored large numbers of ethnic minority students. Her hands-on approach to mentoring reaches far beyond her department to K-12 to university and government professionals, and across disciplines including biology, mathematics, computer sciences, and mechanical and chemical engineering.

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