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Event
Physical and Mathematical Principles of Brain Structure and Function

May 5, 2013 5:00 PM  to 
May 5, 2013 8:00 PM
Holiday Inn Arlington, 4610 N Fairfax Drive, Arlington, VA 22203

May 6, 2013 8:30 AM  to 
May 6, 2013 6:30 PM
Holiday Inn Arlington, 4610 N Fairfax Drive, Arlington, VA 22203

May 7, 2013 9:00 AM  to 
May 7, 2013 4:30 PM
Holiday Inn Arlington, 4610 N Fairfax Drive, Arlington, VA 22203

The Physics Division and The Division of Mathematical Sciences in MPS, and the Division of Integrative Organismal Systems in BIO at the National Science Foundation are sponsoring a Physical and Mathematical Principles of Brain Structure and Function" workshop to be held in Arlington, VA, to bring leading scientists together to identify basic physical and mathematical principles of brain structure and function. As you well know, understanding how the human brain works has emerged as a major international focus of research for the coming decade, which will require advances in structural, functional, and computational neuroscience that can only be developed through experiments and computational studies on model systems such as nematodes, fruit flies, zebrafish, mice, and primates.

This workshop will bring together over 100 neuroscientists and technologists to identify a set of goals in basic neuroscience and tool development to facilitate mapping activity in large arrays of neurons during behavior.

http://physicsoflivingsystems.org//

Meeting Type
Workshop

Contacts
Krastan B. Blagoev, (703) 292-4666, kblagoev@nsf.gov
       Preferred Contact Method: Email

NSF Related Organizations
Directorate for Mathematical & Physical Sciences

 



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