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Event
Inventing the Future of Technology with Emotion

CISE Distinguished Lecture

October 10, 2012 10:00 AM  to 
October 10, 2012 11:00 AM
NSF Room 110

Abstract:

Affective computing was originally envisioned to make computers emotionally intelligent, e.g., recognizing if they've annoyed you, and responding in a way that doesn't escalate your frustration.  Over the years we've created dozens of technologies in an effort to provide tools that comfortably and respectfully recognize and respond to human emotion - and some of them succeed.  Successful affective technologies do not merely make machines intelligent, they also help people be smarter - especially for those of us who face challenges processing emotional information, whether because of having autism, having limited vision, or having other impediments to understanding emotion.   Along the way I have encountered big surprises.  I will share stories of things learned and will attempt some (risky) live demonstrations.  

Bio:

Dr. Rosalind Picard is a Professor at the MIT Media Lab. She holds degrees in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science from Georgia Tech and MIT and is a fellow of the IEEE.  She has authored or co-authored over 200 scientific articles in signal processing, computer vision, pattern recognition, machine learning, and affective computing.  Dr. Picard wrote the book Affective Computing, which helped give rise to a field by that name. 

Picard is also co-founder, chief scientist, and chairman of Affectiva, Inc., supported by an NSF SBIR,  which has commercialized two of the technologies she will show.

To Join the Webinar:

The Webinar will be held from 10:00-11:00am EST on October 10, 2012 in Room 110.

To attend virtually, please register by October 9, 23:59 PDT at: https://mmancusa.webex.com/mmancusa/j.php?ED=191476197&RG=1&UID=0&RT=MiMxMQ%3D%3D

After your registration is accepted, you will get an email with a URL to join the meeting. Please be sure to join a few minutes before the start of the webinar. This system does not establish a voice connection on your computer; instead, your acceptance message will have a toll-free phone number that you will be prompted to call after joining.  Please note that this registration is a manual process; therefore, do not expect an immediate acceptance.  In the event the number of requests exceeds the capacity, some requests may have to be denied.

 

This event is part of Distinguished Lecture Series.

Meeting Type
Lecture

Contacts
Dawn Patterson, (703) 292-8910, dpatters@nsf.gov

NSF Related Organizations
Directorate for Computer & Information Science & Engineering

 



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