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Discoveries

NSF's public investment in science, engineering, education and technology helps to create knowledge and sustain prosperity. Read here about the Internet, microbursts, Web browsers, extrasolar planets, and more... a panoply of discoveries and innovations that began with NSF support.

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A 3-D computer model of a stent. Scientists Use Math to Build Better Stents
University of Houston mathematician Sunica Canic and her colleagues build computer models to study stents; their simulations could lead to better designs and also help doctors select the right stents for specific procedures
Released  August 26, 2010
Photo of Amy Barnes making phosphorus-rich phosphate glass to use with her doctoral research work. On Earth Day and Everyday, Ecologist Fights for Phosphorus
NSF-supported ecologist James Elser is internationally recognized as an expert on phosphorus in biology and ecology, and his research could help to change society’s views on phosphorus use and conservation
Released  May 6, 2010
Photo of a spiny waterflea. Estimating the True Costs Of Invasive Species in the Great Lakes
Graduate student John Rothlisberger describes his research to measure losses caused by non-native species that were introduced by ocean-going ships
Released  December 1, 2008
Photo of Jonathan Arnold and Heinz-Bernd Schuttler discussing their work on biological clocks. The Biological Clock's Incredible Influence Revealed
University of Georgia researchers find that the number of genes under the control of the biological clock in bread mold is dramatically higher than previously reported
Released  November 5, 2008

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