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Mathematics Discoveries

NSF's public investment in science, engineering, education and technology helps to create knowledge and sustain prosperity. Read here about the Internet, microbursts, Web browsers, extrasolar planets, and more... a panoply of discoveries and innovations that began with NSF support.

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Page: Previous |Next (Showing: 31-38 of 38)

2006 in Review 2006: Year in Review
A look back at some of the NSF-supported activities highlighted last year
Released  January 9, 2007
The challenge is to assign each grant application to the appropriate reviewers. Computer Program Streamlines Complex Work Scheduling
Chemical engineers develop an algorithm that could transform scheduling
Released  December 6, 2005
Side-by-side images of double-bubbles of equal and unequal volume chambers. Double Soap Bubbles: Proof Positive of Optimal Geometry
What do dish soap, an ancient question, a team of mathematicians and their ingenious proof of the Double Bubble Conjecture have to do with solving 21st century optimization problems? Plenty.
Released  October 7, 2004
Mathematical equations on chalkboard. 350 Years Later, Fermat's Last Theorem Finally Proved
In the 1630s, Pierre de Fermat set a thorny challenge for mathematics with a note scribbled in the margin of a page. More than 350 years later, mathematician Andrew Wiles finally closed the book on Fermat's Last Theorem.
Released  September 21, 2004
Pearson International Airport power plant Game Theorist Describes Unintended Consequences of U.S. Counterterrorism Policies
World events might not suggest that a decline in terrorism incidents has taken place during the post-Cold War era. Yet, economists have identified just such a trend while revealing that the likelihood of death or injury from terrorism has increased.
Released  July 30, 2004
icon of a hand and www Detecting Hidden Groups on the Internet
In the free-form clamor of the Internet's discussion groups and other public forums, researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute want to listen for the whispers of groups trying to stay hidden.
Released  July 30, 2004
drawing of a triangular faucet opening. Triangles, Not Circles, Make Optimal Faucets
It had long been assumed that circular nozzles, such as those used by ink-jet printers to deposit tiny droplets of ink, were the best shapes for the job. Now, mathematicians at Harvard University have shown that triangular may be the way to go.
Released  July 30, 2004
Approaching wildfire threatens a subdivision Improving Fire Forecasts
Can mathematics help prevent forest fires? Itís not as far-fetched as it sounds. A statistician has combined unprecedented amounts of historical and environmental data to create statistical models that promise more accurate estimates of fire hazards.
Released  July 21, 2004

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