text-only page produced automatically by LIFT Text Transcoder Skip all navigation and go to page contentSkip top navigation and go to directorate navigationSkip top navigation and go to page navigation
National Science Foundation
Discoveries
design element
Discoveries
Search Discoveries
About Discoveries
Discoveries by Research Area
Arctic & Antarctic
Astronomy & Space
Biology
Chemistry & Materials
Computing
Earth & Environment
Education
Engineering
Mathematics
Nanoscience
People & Society
Physics
 

Email this pagePrint this page
All Images

Discovery
Adélie Penguins Cope With Climate Change

Back to article | Note about images

David Ainley and Jean Pennycook are studying Adélie penguins in Antarctica to learn how they may adapt to climate change. Ainley is looking closely at the "superbreeders" among the penguins for clues.

Credit: Gwendolyn Morgan, National Science Foundation

 

Jean Pennycook with group of Adélie penguins on the beach

Jean Pennycook is an education and public outreach specialist with Penguin Science. She talks with students over Skype about Adélie penguins, in hopes of attracting them into math and science fields.

Credit: Penguinscience.com


Download the high-resolution JPG version of the image. (2.3 MB)

Use your mouse to right-click (Mac users may need to Ctrl-click) the link above and choose the option that will save the file or target to your computer.

David Ainley holding an Adélie penguin

A long-term polar researcher, David Ainley is studying how climate change is affecting Adélie penguin populations in Antarctica.

Credit: Penguinscience.com


Download the high-resolution JPG version of the image. (2.8 MB)

Use your mouse to right-click (Mac users may need to Ctrl-click) the link above and choose the option that will save the file or target to your computer.

close up image of an Adélie penguin with chick

Each year, researchers at Ross Island's three bird colonies band a large number of chicks just before they make their first trip to the sea. Adélie penguins are banded so penguin researchers can track them throughout their life cycle. The purpose of this type of work is to see how penguins are responding to climate change.

Credit: Penguinscience.com


Download the high-resolution JPG version of the image. (2.4 MB)

Use your mouse to right-click (Mac users may need to Ctrl-click) the link above and choose the option that will save the file or target to your computer.



Email this pagePrint this page
Back to Top of page