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Discovery
Boy or Girl? Understanding How Red-Tailed Hawks Migrate

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Photo of Professor James Hewlett with a red-tailed hawk in hand.

Professor James Hewlett with a red-tailed hawk in hand.

Credit: Anne Schnell, Finger Lakes Community College


Download the high-resolution JPG version of the image. (184 KB)

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Photo of Professor James Hewlett with a juvenile male red-tailed hawk.

Professor James Hewlett with a juvenile male red-tailed hawk prior to the hawk's being released.

Credit: James Hewlett, Finger Lakes Community College


Download the high-resolution JPG version of the image. (81 KB)

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Photo of a blind that researchers use to study hawk populations in upstate New York.

An example of one of Braddock Bay Raptor Research's blinds that researchers use to study hawk populations in upstate New York.

Credit: James Hewlett, Finger Lakes Community College


Download the high-resolution JPG version of the image. (169 KB)

Use your mouse to right-click (Mac users may need to Ctrl-click) the link above and choose the option that will save the file or target to your computer.

Photo of a genetic analysis of a female red-tailed hawk.

Results of the genetic analysis conducted by Finger Lakes Community College and Braddock Bay Raptor Research (BBRR). The two dark bands inside the box indicate that this data is for a female red-tailed hawk.

Credit: James Hewlett, Finger Lakes Community College


Download the high-resolution JPG version of the image. (69 KB)

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