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Discovery
Breakthrough in Electron Spin Control Brings Quantum Computers Closer to Reality

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Illustration showing optical beam splitter method and new method of controlling electron spin.

This figure shows how a quantum dot device can be used in analogy with an optical beam splitter for coherent control of spin states.

Credit: Jason Petta, Physics Department, Princeton University


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Photo of Jason Petta, who found a way to alter a lone electron without disturbing neighbors.

Jason Petta, an assistant professor of physics at Princeton University, has found a way to alter the property of a lone electron without disturbing the trillions of electrons in its immediate surroundings. Such a feat is an important step toward developing future types of quantum computers.

Credit: Princeton University, Office of Communications, Brian Wilson


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Photo shows equipment used to trap one or two electrons in microscopic corrals.

In his laboratory, Princeton University associate physics professor Jason Petta has trapped one or two electrons in microscopic corrals created by applying voltages to miniscule electrodes on a wafer of semiconductor.

Credit: Princeton University, Office of Communications, Brian Wilson


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Image of a sample used to trap single electrons.

A method developed by assistant professor of Physics at Princeton Jason Petta and a team of researchers from Princeton and University of California, Irvine traps one or two electrons in microscopic corrals created by applying voltages to minuscule electrodes giving them an ability to control spin orientation.

Credit: Jason Petta, Physics Department, Princeton University


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