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Discovery
Beyond Cold: How the World Works at Minus 459 Degrees

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Computer graphic showing quantum vortices formed when atoms expand for 50 thousandths of a second.

If we let the atoms expand for even longer, 50 thousandths of a second, we can see that quantum vortices have formed. The vortices appear as holes in this image.

Credit: Brian DeMarco, University of Illinois


Download the high-resolution JPG version of the image. (200 KB)

Use your mouse to right-click (Mac users may need to Ctrl-click) the link above and choose the option that will save the file or target to your computer.

Computer graphic showing quantum vortices, which are responsible for stopping atomic motions.

The vortices are made more visible in this image by subtracting off everything but the vortices. These vortices are responsible for stopping the motion of the atoms.

Credit: Brian DeMarco, University of Illinois


Download the high-resolution JPG version of the image. (141 KB)

Use your mouse to right-click (Mac users may need to Ctrl-click) the link above and choose the option that will save the file or target to your computer.

This animation shows data used to measure how atoms move through the crystal of light. These images are taken after the light is turned off, and the atoms are allowed to freely expand for about 20 thousandths of a second. If you look carefully, you can see that the motion slows down.

Credit: Brian DeMarco, University of Illinois

 

Graduate student David McKay gives a tour of Brian DeMarco's lab at the University of Illinois.

Credit: Brian DeMarco, University of Illinois

 

Photo of David McKay, graduate student in Brain DeMarco's lab.

David McKay, graduate student in Brain DeMarco's lab at the University of Illinois.

Credit: Brian DeMarco, University of Illinois


Download the high-resolution JPG version of the image. (2 MB)

Use your mouse to right-click (Mac users may need to Ctrl-click) the link above and choose the option that will save the file or target to your computer.



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