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Physics Discoveries

NSF's public investment in science, engineering, education and technology helps to create knowledge and sustain prosperity. Read here about the Internet, microbursts, Web browsers, extrasolar planets, and more... a panoply of discoveries and innovations that began with NSF support.

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Page: Previous |Next (Showing: 31-60 of 63)

Photo of end-on view of high numerical aperture custom lens system used to trap and image an atom. Excited Atoms Advance Quantum Computing
Scientists using a single atom to control another with the Rydberg Blockade principle have moved a step closer to unimaginable computing power
Released  February 24, 2009
Illustration showing one sphere being repelled from a plate and the other sphere being attracted. Nanoscale Repulsion
Tiny quantum force, measured for the first time, could be an aid to nanodevice designers
Released  February 19, 2009
Image showing ball and stick model of two crossing carbon nanotubes on a graphite surface. Measuring Excitement for Carbon Nanotubes
Studying light pulses in nanoscale molecules brings scientists closer to understanding properties that may lead to a multitude of applications
Released  February 10, 2009
Image of transparent ceramic. Pore-free Ceramics Shine New Light on Lasers, Electronics and Biomedical Implants
Novel process for developing transparent ceramics from powder eliminates pores
Released  January 29, 2009
Illustration of the inside of the vacum chamber showing the spectrometer. For the "Few-Body Problem," a Solution From Another Plane
Complex ionization collisions can be explained with a "simple" classical model
Released  December 29, 2008
Photo of Ben Arend installing a detector during the reconfiguration of the NSCL's experimental area. Unlocking the Secrets of Atomic Nuclei
Rare isotope research at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory leads to important new applications in areas such as medical treatments and security technology
Released  November 13, 2008
artist's rendition of polar gas molecules First Ultracold Polar Molecule Gas Ready for Research
Groundbreaking technique could lead to quantum computers, molecular clocks and super-efficient power plants
Released  October 29, 2008
Photograph of the compact muon solenoid detector at CERN. Physicists Gear Up for Huge Data Flow
University of Nebraska researchers build a computer center to handle the flood of data expected from the world's next-generation particle accelerator
Released  August 7, 2008
Computer graphic showing quantum vortices formed when atoms expand for 50 thousandths of a second. Beyond Cold: How the World Works at Minus 459 Degrees
Graduate student David McKay describes how atoms are cooled to near absolute zero for research using an approach called quantum simulation
Released  July 25, 2008
A picture of the setting sun off the coast of Estonia and the letter "A." Cracking the Code of Images
New software easily detects pictures' hidden messages
Released  July 15, 2008
Illustration of photocathode gun. Brightest X-ray Vision at the Nano-scale
Superconducting 'universal toolkit' for scientists, engineers will conserve energy, too
Released  June 6, 2008
Photo of the detector slice from the back, at the surface. Building a Machine to Search for Cosmic Secrets
Katherine McAlpine describes the intricate lowering into place of the last large piece of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) detector, part of the Large Hadron Collider
Released  April 2, 2008
Photo of Matt Johnson, NSCL staff engineer, inspecting a 45-degree dipole magnet Nuclear Scientists Explore the Core of Existence
A journalist at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory describes physicists' experiments to understand the neutron dripline and some surprising results
Released  March 24, 2008
2007 In Review 2007: Year in Review
A look back at some of the NSF-supported advances and activities reported last year
Released  January 30, 2008
Photo of Shirley Ann Jackson and William Bialek Top Scientists Promote Innovative, Multidisciplinary Global Problem-Solving Strategies
 
Released  December 11, 2007
Photo shows Exotic Beam Summer School students viewing progress of their experiments. Nuclear Physics Boot Camp Preps Future Scientists
Exotic Beam Summer School stimulates new learning and discoveries in nuclear physics students.
Released  October 19, 2007
Photo of the ATLAS Barrel Toroid Magnet and a person standing in the center UltraLight Project: Moving Huge Amounts of Data
In spring 2008, the largest particle accelerator in the world will be completed
Released  August 24, 2007
Eric Weeks and shaving cream with squishy physics spelled in black letters The Science of All Things Squishy
NSF-funded Emory researcher shares the excitement of cutting-edge physics phenomena with kids of all ages
Released  August 16, 2007
2006 in Review 2006: Year in Review
A look back at some of the NSF-supported activities highlighted last year
Released  January 9, 2007
Electrons hitting an iron-carbide filled carbon nanotube cause it to contract and extrude material. Nanotubes Not for Toothpaste . . . Yet
Researchers Squeeze Even Rock-Hard Materials Through Minuscule Carbon Tubes
Released  July 25, 2006
With strong magnetic fields and cold temperatures, magnetic order in barium-copper silicate emerges. Purple Haze
Ancient pigment reveals secrets about unusual state of matter
Released  July 11, 2006
Vesicle membranes that collapse when cooled may someday deliver minute payloads of medicines. Micro Pills Could Deliver Drugs on Demand
Temperature-sensitive capsules release chemicals at tightly controlled rates
Released  March 27, 2006
This illustration compares the artificial cochlea to its mammalian counterpart. New Sensor Based on Human Organ Is No Tin Ear
Precision micromachining yields life-size, precise, artificial cochlea
Released  November 3, 2005
The new nanofountain probe produced these patterns; features are as thin as 40 nanometers The World’s Smallest Fountain Pen?
New microscope tips use capillary action to print patterns tens of nanometers across
Released  October 5, 2005
Illustration comparing two theories behind the Rio Grande rifting. Deeper View Helps Explain Rio Grande Rift
Subsurface revealed down to the Earth's mantle
Released  March 1, 2005
NSF and the Ford Motor Company Fund have provided funding for Mr. Kumah and other undergraduates at High Energy Physics Center Attracts U.S. Undergrads to Summer in Switzerland
Apprenticeship at the European Laboratory for Particle Physics (CERN) in Geneva, Switzerland
Released  January 27, 2005
NSF South Pole research station Cold Flashes: Astrophysics at the South Pole
What one scientist calls the world’s weirdest telescope was built to detect high-energy particles, not the light from distant stars. In 1997, AMANDA recorded the first precise map of neutrinos from outer space as they zipped through Antarctic ice.
Released  October 13, 2004
Side-by-side images of double-bubbles of equal and unequal volume chambers. Double Soap Bubbles: Proof Positive of Optimal Geometry
What do dish soap, an ancient question, a team of mathematicians and their ingenious proof of the Double Bubble Conjecture have to do with solving 21st century optimization problems? Plenty.
Released  October 7, 2004
Artist's conception of OGLE-TR-56b. Ogling Distant Stars
An NSF-funded project that monitors the brightness of stars has given astronomers a potent tool for discovering planets far beyond our part of the galaxy. We can expect to find more "exoplanets" in the decade ahead.
Released  August 9, 2004
drawing of a triangular faucet opening. Triangles, Not Circles, Make Optimal Faucets
It had long been assumed that circular nozzles, such as those used by ink-jet printers to deposit tiny droplets of ink, were the best shapes for the job. Now, mathematicians at Harvard University have shown that triangular may be the way to go.
Released  July 30, 2004

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